Lamb with Olive Tapenade Rice (Paleo, AIP, Whole30)

If you like olives, make this tonight. If you don’t like olives, we cannot be friends in real life. Fine. Yes, we can. We just can’t be the type of friends that sit around on a Thursday night throwing olives into each other’s mouths from across the living room.

You know what I’m tired of seeing? Paleo recipes that use quotation marks to delineate that the “Rice” or “Bread” in the recipe isn’t your standard grain-based rice or bread. It makes you feel like you’re losing out (you’re not). Like, “hey you know Rice, that sexy guy down the street? This isn’t him, but it’s Rice’s cute little sister “rice”‘. How about we just revise what those words mean and never use quotation marks again?

I had my first visit with a naturopathic doctor today. I have given up on the Western medical community. I am reserving their services the next time I sprain my ankle or need some advice on what not to do. I am super excited about her. She sent me home with a stool test. That should be fun. I had to take the train home with my nondescript white paper bag full of empty stool samples that cost $300. I was PARANOID that someone would choose this evening to mug me. I sometimes plan in my head what I will say if someone does try to rob me (“What would your mother say if she saw what you were up to?”) Tonight I decided a simple “That’s for my poop.” should ward off any villains.

Lamb with Olive Tapenade Rice

Serves 3-4 | Prep Time 10 minutes | Cook Time 14 minutes

1/2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted

1 tbsp chopped fresh Oregano

1 tbsp Olive oil

3 cups Butternut squash, cubes

1 lb Ground lamb

1/2 tsp Cinnamon

1/2 cup Raisins

1/2 tsp Sea salt

  1. Place olives, oregano, and olive oil in a food processor/blender and pulse until finely chopped. Set aside.

  2. Now place butternut squash in the blender/processor (no need to wash it – yay!) and pulse until finely chopped. Set aside.

  3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the ground lamb. Do not disturb for 4 minutes until the lamb is browned on one side. Now use a wooden spoon to break the meat into bite-sized chunks (size of mini meatballs). Flip each chunk and brown the other side for 2 minutes.

  4. Add in the riced olives, butternut, cinnamon, raisins, and sea salt. Stir well, cover with a lid, and reduce heat to low. Cook for 5-6 more minutes. Serve warm.

Shrimp Ceviche Salad (Paleo, AIP, Whole30)

 

 

My newest guest post recipe on Autoimmune Paleo is a triple threat: simple to prepare, nutritious, and refreshing enough for a hot summer day. I envision myself lounging around on the pool deck in mid-July after a long day playing in the ocean, kicking back with a fizzy Kombucha, ceviche, and some plantain chips with guac! Does that not sound like perfection? Okay true perfection would be an ice cold lager, but that ain’t happening.

 

To make this an even quicker preparation, find pre-cooked shrimp at your seafood counter. You could even grill the shrimp for added flavor. I would marinade them in some lime juice, olive oil and garlic beforehand for extra flavor!

 

So just how healthy is Shrimp Ceviche Salad?

Shrimp is rich in copper, selenium, omega-3’s, and vitamin B12. I don’t recommend making it a huge portion of your seafood budget because it’s difficult to source wild-caught and sustainably caught shrimp these days. Sad face. They are often farmed and/or trolled, so chat with your local fish dude and ask him what your best option is!

 

Get the recipe for

Shrimp Ceviche Salad here!

Bacon & Kale Breakfast Skillet (Paleo, AIP, 21DSD, Whole30)

 

 

I know I joke about being an 85 year old stuck in a 26 year old body,  but I think I’ve taken it too far. We are home on a Friday night surrounded in pillows watching Dateline reruns with ice water. Party.

 

You know what’s more fun than watching TV on Friday night!? Breakfast. I’ve been eating this quick and simple sautee regularly for breakfast since throwing it together a couple months ago on a cold winter morning. I have another recipe that I want to post before the end of the weekend for Skillet Apple Crumble. It is sweetener-free and SO delicious and uses Anti-Grain Apple Flour. So get on that if you don’t already own it because you won’t want to miss out on this recipe!

 

Bacon & Kale Breakfast Skillet

Serves 1 | Prep Time 5 minutes | Cook Time 12 minutes

2 slices Bacon, chopped

1 bunch Lacinato kale, 2-inch pieces

2 tbsp Coconut milk

1 tsp Minced garlic

1/4-1/2 tsp Truffle Salt

1. Cook chopped bacon in a skillet until crispy. Set aside the bacon but leave bacon fat in the skillet.

2. Cook kale in the bacon fat until wilted. Stir in the coconut milk, minced garlic, and truffle salt. Reduce heat to low and simmer until the coconut milk has thickened and the garlic flavor has mellowed, 1-2 minutes.

3. Serve warm as either a side dish or a light meal.

Garlic-Dill Parsnip Fries (Paleo, AIP, Whole30, Vegan)

 

 

Wooh! This weekend was a friggin’ blast. My twin sis got married to the perfect man, and I got to laugh, cry, and dance my way through the whole thing by her side. This was actually my first time being “in” a wedding as my friends tend to be the I-N-D-E-P-E-N-D-E-N-T type. I took a little break from cooking but now I’ll be back at it as I start my new fieldwork rotation tomorrow, and meal prep is the only way I survive the Monday-Friday.

 

I fed these Garlic-Dill Parnsip Fries to my family as we lazed around all Sunday with our post-wedding hangovers (mine was the sleep-deprived variety). As weird as it sounds, it feels so good to be sore all over from dancing for hours on end. I haven’t had nearly enough fun in my life since the start of this Hashi’s flare, and I’m the type of gal that would rather be enjoying life than worrying about my health. I have a feeling most of you are that way too…

 

We had the best brunch this morning at Cassis in downtown St. Pete… unlimited and it was super easy to stick to Paleo and AIP. I had oysters, crab leg, bacon, honey ham, fruit salad, and roasted beets. I was sad when showed up and realized it was a $40 buffet and almost didn’t get a plate because I assumed all I would be able to eat was fruit. Such a pleasant surprise! We are going to go back for Mother’s Day brunch so we can do it right this time (right = 2 plates).

 

Garlic-Dill Parsnip Fries 

Serves 2-4 | Prep Time 10 minutes | Cook Time 35 minutes

1 lbs parsnips, peeled

1 T coconut oil, melted

3 garlic cloves, crushed

1 T chopped dill, tightly packed

½ tsp sea salt

1. Slice parsnips into fries 2 inches in length and 1/3 inch wide. Place parsnip fries on a large baking sheet with parchment paper.

2. Whisk together remaining ingredients in a small bowl. Pour over fries and toss to coat.

3. Bake at 375 degrees for 25 minutes. Flip fries and Increase oven temperature to 450 degrees and bake for another 10 minutes.

Plantain Chips & Avocado Dip [AIP/Whole30/Paleo]

I was deadset on some pseudo-Mexican food tonight, so I combined all remotely Mexican-y ingredients in my kitchen for this bomb meal. The shredded pork is Nom Nom Paleo’s famous recipe for Kalua Pig made in my Instant Pot. Best investment I have ever made for my kitchen by the way. It makes batch cooking so dang easy and delicious. I layered plantain chips dipped in Avocado Dip with pork on top, sat on the floor of my balcony, and watched the sun go down. It was a fantabulous way to spend a Monday night. 

Good news from the “Great Hashi’s Flare of 2015” front. General Fatigue has retreated, and I am now able to pick up my exercise again! Considering I may be one of the most kinesthetic, hyperactive people you have ever met, my lethargy of the past several months was more depressing than my heinous bloodwork. I was walking home from work tonight and not feeling completely wiped, anxious, depressed, and foggy like I have been almost every day at 5pm since the beginning of January. I can’t explain to you how pumped that made me feel. I was starting to think this flare would be my forever (irrational thoughts & Hashi’s go well together). I still have a long ways to go to get my hormones back on track, but since I realize that is a long-term goal, it doesn’t bother me as much. For the meantime, I am still confined to my stretchiest yoga pants and lots of “No, I can’t go out tonight. My adrenals will hate me tomorrow.”‘s. 

But at least I’m on the up & up (as far as I know!). I will be getting more follow up labs done in a week, and I’m really looking forward to getting my numbers. Thyroid dork. It feels like winning the lottery when your T3 increases. If you’ve got Hashi’s, ya feel me. 

Avocado Dip [AIP/Whole30/Paleo/Vegan]

Makes 1 cup

1 Avocado, ripe

¼ cup Coconut butter, melted

¼ cup Water, filtered

1 T Apple cider vinegar

1 T lemon juice or lime juice

½ cup Parsley or cilantro, finely chopped

3 Garlic cloves, chopped

½ tsp Sea salt or truffle salt

1. Place all ingredients in a high-powered blender or food processor and puree until mostly smooth. Parsley and lemon go well together or you can do cilantro and lime juice! Truffle salt takes this dip to a new level!

Plantain Chips [AIP/Whole30/Paleo/Vegan]

1 Plantain, green, peeled, sliced ¼ inch thick

1 T Coconut oil or choice solid cooking fat

Sea salt

1. Heat coconut oil or solid far in large skillet over medium-high heat until hot. Place plantains in oil and fry 2-3 minutes each side until golden brown on both sides. Sprinkle with sea salt to taste. Serve with Avocado Dip and Kalua Pig

Garlic Fried Chicken Livers (Paleo, AIP, Whole30, 21dsd)

 

 

Chicken livers are my favorite organ meat because they are the most mild and versatile. Beef liver, even when hidden in bacon, mushrooms, and herbs, still is undoable for me. And I’ve had it a lot. It just never gets any better. Maybe my taste buds will change soon for it.

 

I’m currently homeless. The apartment complex that was supposed to house me for 3 months in Atlanta decided they actually don’t have a furnished unit for us even though I start my new job in 10 days. This is going to be a real holiday treat trying to find last minute housing and furniture. I’ve had the worst luck lately with poor customer service. I guess it’s not really bad luck but a testament to how inefficient the service industry has become. Sigh. I cannot wait to be a homeowner, even though that has its own issues, at least you have a bit more control.

 

Well, what I can control right now is my breathing. And writing helps me get my mind off crappy life events. I enjoyed a big bowl of these yummy garlic-fried chicken livers with my pup last week on the balcony. One for me, one for him. He maxed out at two though. What a wimpy doodle.

 

These pan-friend chicken livers will convert organ meat haters! And you can’t beat the nutrition of offal!

 

 

50 reviews

Garlic Fried Chicken Livers

Prep Time 00:10 Cook Time 00:00

Ingredients

Directions

  1. Whisk dry ingredients together in a bowl. Add chicken livers and toss to coat evenly.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon coconut oil in large deep frying pan over medium-high heat. Add half of the chicken livers to the pan, ensuring they do not touch, and let fry for 3 minutes. Flip and let cook 3 more minutes. Place on paper-towel lined plate. Repeat with the second half of chicken livers, adding more coconut oil to pan as needed.
  3. Serve with sliced lemons and a sprinkle of parsley.

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Roast Chicken with Lebanese Stuffing (Paleo, AIP, Whole30)

I was crossing my fingers that I would nail this recipe on the first attempt and I did. I think because I have such an emotional connection to this meal from childhood, my limbic system was able to guide my cooking intuition. I explained on Instagram recently that my family didn’t do traditional Thanksgiving turkey & stuffing growing up, but a simple Lebanese roasted chicken stuffed with a spiced mixture of beef, rice, onion, pine nuts, cinnamon and allspice. I was hell-bent on making an AIP version of all my favorite “Lebanese Feast” (that’s what my twin sister and I call it) dishes so I can enjoy them this year too. Last year, I couldn’t eat ANY of the Christmas dinner, and I threw a temper tantrum full of tears and “Why can’t  you guys realize that it sucks to have allergies, and that I deserve to eat this food too!!!!” So attractive. I still throw tantrums in my head, but I try not to execute them in front of other humans. That’s how you do AIP responsibly.

 

It was really only after that outburst that my family recognized my need to have that emotional connection to food that they all still get to enjoy. Nobody was going to forgo the rice stuffing or tahini and chickpea hummus just for me though, so I said F it, I’m going to make my own AIP versions and they’re going to be even better, starting with this dish! The parsnips add such a nice earthy taste, and you won’t believe how awesome ground beef stuffing with a perfectly roasted chicken tastes! The skin will be crispy and the meat very juicy by using my method below. With a squeeze of roasted lemon on top and a heaping scoop of stuffing, you’re going to shoot right out of any bland food rut you may have found yourself in lately (it happens to the best of us!)

 

So for Lebanese Christmas Feast this year, I’ll be making both the traditional and AIP versions of these dishes

– Lebanese Chicken & Stuffing (recipe  below)

AIP Hummus by Me

AIP Pita by He Won’t Know Its Paleo

– Whole Carrot Taboulleh from The Paleo Approach Cookbook

– AIP Kibbeh (recipe to be developed) <– this usually has gluten, pine nuts, and seed-based spices

– AIP Mammoul Balls (recipe to be developed) <– these are traditionally made of walnuts

 

 

 

Lebanese Roast Chicken & Stuffing

Serves 4-5 | Ready in

Beef & Parsnip Rice Stuffing

1 lb lean grass-fed ground beef

1 small onion, peeled and diced

6 large parsnips, cut into chunks

1 tsp cinnamon, divided

1/16 tsp ground cloves

1/2 tsp sea salt

1 cup bone broth, divided

1 T lard

2 T dried mint

¼ tsp granulated garlic

2 tsp lemon juice

Optional: 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts (if tolerated – not AIP)

  1. Process parsnips in food processor using the ricing disc, or alternatively pulse in a high powered blender until the parnsip is broken into rice-sized pieces.
  2. Cook ground beef in a large, deep skillet until almost cooked through. Break up with a spoon into small pieces as it cooks. Turn heat off and stir in just ½ tsp cinnamon, cloves, and ¼ tsp sea salt. Set aside in a bowl.
  3. Heat lard over medium heat in the same skillet. Add onions first and then the parsnips, cover, and let cook for 3 minutes until the bottom layer of onions begins to caramelize. Remove lid and stir well. Add just ½ cup bone broth to skillet. Cover with lid again and let steam cook for 3 more minutes until parsnips are cooked through but still tender. Remove pan from heat, stir in mint, remaining ½ tsp cinnamon, remaining ½ cup bone broth, remaining ¼ tsp sea salt, garlic, lemon juice,  the cooked ground beef, and pine nuts (if using). The broth should be absorbed in the meat and vegetables as you stir.

Lebanese Roast Chicken

1 whole pasture-raised chicken (about 3 lbs)

1 T lard

½ lemon

4 sprigs fresh oregano

4 sprigs fresh rosemary

½ tsp sea salt

  1. Remove chicken from refrigerator 30 minutes prior to seasoning.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Set a small roasting rack on top of a large baking sheet. This allows the chicken to crisp up on the bottom too. No one likes soggy chicken skin.
  3. Prepare the chicken for roasting: Dry the chicken well by patting with paper towels both on the outside and inside the cavity (very important!!). Rub lard on the chicken, coating evenly. Sprinkle the sea salt evenly over the whole chicken. Stuff the lemon and fresh herbs in the cavity and tie the legs together with kitchen string. You can also bring the wings closer to the breast and secure them tightly with another piece of string.
  4. Cook the chicken: Roast on prepared rack and baking sheet for 55 minutes. Increasing cooking time by 15 minutes per lb (if chicken weighs more than 3 lbs) until breast internal temperature reads 170 degrees Fahrenheit. Turn the oven off and let the chicken rest in the oven for 10 minutes with the door closed. Remove the chicken from the oven and let rest on the countertop, covered, for 10 more minutes before slicing. After slicing, squeeze lemon all over chicken and sprinkle with more sea salt. Serve with warm Beef & Parsnip Stuffing and AIP Hummus!

AIP Garlic Butter (Paleo, Vegan)

 

I didn’t know I missed garlic butter until I tasted AIP garlic butter. My mother (aka Mommy and Moo-Moo… yes Moo-Moo) used to stir fresh crushed garlic into tubs of butter when I was growing up, and we would slather it all over toast with a giant salad as the main course. There’s a reason I have a vegetable fetish – we ate salads almost every single night for dinner. Fist bump, Moo-Moo, you did it right!

 

So you can make this recipe into the solid form as seen above with a simple modification of adding 1 T coconut oil, OR you can leave that out and just have a whipped butter spread. Presentation-wise, the butter stick is more endearing for dinner parties and such, but either way it’s going to end up into melted goodness as seen on that euphoric roasted Japanese yam below. Ah, this stuff is SO good. I tossed my steamed veggies in it tonight, served it as a spread on cold chicken meatballs the other day, and have eaten more than 1 and less than 6 spoonfuls of the stuff just for fun.

 

I head to NYC on Friday for my twin sister’s bachelorette party. I’m the “matron” of honor, so I’ve been planning the whole thing. I’ll update everyone when I get back, but I hope to share some of my eats on Instagram over the weekend! This old matron needs her rest now – I think my eyelids droop a quarter inch every time I type the word “matron” .

 

 
AIP Garlic Butter

Ready in 5 minutes (+ 1 hour fridge time for stick version)

½ cup palm shortening

2 T red palm oil

1 ½ tsp pressed garlic (about 3-4 large cloves)

¼ tsp fine sea salt

1 T melted coconut oil (optional: for butter stick version)

  1. In a medium-sized bowl, stir together the palm shortening, red palm oil, garlic, and sea salt until well combined and smooth. Alternately, you can whip it together for the ultimate light and fluffy texture using a hand mixer.
  2. For whipped butter, simply store in a covered glass container for up to 2 weeks.
  3. For stick butter, stir in the melted coconut oil. Pour mixture into a log shape on a square of parchment or wax paper. Roll into a rectangular shape, using your fingers to square off the ends and shape the butter as desired. Let harden in refrigerator for 1 hour. Store in a covered glass container for up to 2 weeks.

AIP Hummus (Paleo, Whole30, Vegan)

I freakin’ love hummus. It hurts so bad. You know that lame quote “If you love something let it go, if it comes back to you…”  That’s how I feel about eating AIP Hummus. Sorry, if you used that quotation on your MySpace in 2004; I don’t mean to offend. Internet memes are the new MySpace quote. I just feel like if we spent as much time and energy into volunteering or holding the door for a stranger as we did making memes, this world would really be a different place.

 

Speaking of good deeds, I walked by a homeless man last night. He asked me for money, but I didn’t have anything with me. He told me he takes credit cards. That made me chuckle, so I wanted to go get him a nice treat as a thank you. I went into a little vegan bakery next door and just gave them my memorized credit card number so I could purchase a couple muffins for the gentleman. I thought “I bet he would LOVE some fresh-baked muffins when he wakes up tomorrow morning.” I tracked him down in the parking lot of the gas station he was hanging out, and the following conversation ensued.

 

“Hi, sir. I bought you some muffins. There’s a chocolate and a blueberry.”

– “I don’t want your muffins.”

“But, I bought them just for you. They’re nice and fresh!”

– “I don’t like muffins. I don’t want muffins. I ain’t gonna eat your muffins.”

 

That reads like an innuendo, but it is not. Lesson learned: ask people what they want if you’re going to buy them food! I ended up handing them off to a couple valet guys that looked cold and bored. The irony is we ended up watching the Muffin Top episode of Seinfield an hour after this happened. SEE BELOW. I DIED. Life lessons, life lessons.

 

Rebecca: Are you the ones leaving the muffin pieces behind our shelter?

Elaine: You been enjoying them?

Rebecca: They’re just stumps.

Elaine: Well they’re perfectly edible.

Rebecca: Oh, so you just assume that the homeless will eat them, they’ll eat anything?

Mr. Lippman: No no, we just thought…

Rebecca: I know what you thought. They don’t have homes, they don’t have jobs, what do they need the top of a muffin for? They’re lucky to get the stumps.

Elaine: If the homeless don’t like them the homeless don’t have to eat them.

Rebecca: The homeless don’t like them.

Elaine: Fine.

 

Muffins and hummus have nothing to do with one another but dang it are they both delicious! This bean-free AIP hummus is missing tahini (which is a seed and not allowed in the elimination diet until reintroductions) so it’s not exactly like real hummus but I have served it to family at holidays with my AIP Taboulleh and everyone loved it just the same!

 

 

AIP Hummus

Prep Time 00:00 Cook Time 00:00

Ingredients

  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 3 cups peeled and cubed white sweet potato
  • 2-3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil (additional for thinning if desired)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Directions

  1. Fit a steamer basket over a pot filled halfway with water. Place the cubed sweet potatoes in the basket. Cover and bring to a boil. Let steam for 10 minutes until the potato easily breaks apart with a fork. Reserve the cooking liquid.
  2. Place sweet potato, ¼ cup reserved cooking liquid, and remaining ingredients in food processor. Blend until pureed and completely smooth. You may thin with additional olive oil to your preference.
  3. Serve drizzled with olive oil, fresh parsley, and chopped vegetable crudite, or as a spread on AIP or Paleo sandwiches. Store covered in refrigerator and let come to room temperature before serving (It will solidify slightly in the fridge).

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Anti-Inflammatory Meatballs (Paleo, AIP, Whole30, 21DSD)

 


AIP is inherently an anti-inflammatory diet, so the title of this recipe is like describing a banana to someone who has never eaten one as “banana-y”. These ‘balls are especially designed for people with inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s, and colitis. Just so happens they taste fantastic.

 

I wanted to support my anti-inflammatory claims with some hard & fast research. This kind of stuff really gets me going, and I have a feeling most of you are pretty into the magic of food too.

 

Ginger Benefits

  • Ginger has been shown to relieve joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by inhibiting prostaglandin activity and leukotriene biosynthesis, which are major players in the inflammatory process
  • Researches fed 33 mg of ginger oil to arthritic rats for 26 days, significantly suppressing paw and joint swelling
  • 75% of RA patients in one study experienced marked pain relief and swelling reduction when ingesting ginger, and 100% of people in the study with muscular discomfort reported the same results (Al-Nahain, Jahan & Rahmatullah, 2014)

 

Cilantro Benefits

  • Rats with carageenan*-induced paw edema had significant reductions in inflammation when fed dried coriander (cilantro) seeds via a reduction in macrophagic (inflammatory) activity
  • These rats also showed a significant reduction in granulomas and tumors (Nair, Singh & Gupta, 2013)
  • *Yeah that stuff in your ice cream.

 

Garlic Benefits

  • A study exploring the effects of garlic on insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress of diabetic rats on a high fructose diet found that garlic reduced blood glucose levels and indications of oxidative stress caused by diabetes
  • Garlic has been shown in other studies to lower blood lipid levels and have anti-coagulant and anti-cancer effects
  • Garlic extract used in the study above was made by boiling 100g whole garlic in water for 20 minutes (Sivaraman, Senthilkumar & Bobby, 2013)

 

 

 

These anti-inflammatory beef meatballs feature the powers of cilantro, garlic and ginger!

 

 

256 reviews

Anti-Inflammatory Meatballs

Prep Time 00:15 Cook Time 00:25 Serves 4

 

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs ground beef
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro, tightly packed
  • 5 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
  2. Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Form into 12 equal size meatballs, about 1 ½ inches in diameter. Bake for 23-25 minutes until the center is light pink. Sprinkle with extra sea salt before serving.
  3. Store in a sealed glass container in the fridge or freezer. Serve with a green salad with sliced avocado, parsley, and cilantro.

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Recipe Notes

 You may also use ground pork here or 1 to 2 teaspoons fresh grated ginger in place of the ground ginger.