Kale Pesto Chicken Soup (Paleo/AIP/21dsd/Whole30)

kale pesto chicken soup

 

Anyone else a pesto fanatic like myself? I can’t get enough of AIP pesto… I really don’t miss the nuts or cheese. I know that sounds crazy and like I’ve been doing this too long, and maybe I have. 

 

Pesto Chicken is my favorite combo which is why I created the infamous (as in infamous for turning you into a pizza-craving demon) Pesto Chicken Pizza for The Healing Kitchen. That recipe is legit. Definitely try it if you haven’t yet. Gimme.

 

You all make some crazy delicious pizzas out of my pizza crust recipe from the cookbook – holy moly! I stalk all of them.Today, however, I’m eating it as soup. I’ve never thought to combine the two until I had a craving for bone broth + garlic herb goodness. And goodness. A perfect pair. Still not into making your own bone broth? I found this frozen bone broth by a company called Bonafide Provisions at my local health food store the other day + used it in a pinch for a different soup I made. It was SUPER delicious! It’s also AIP – no nightshades or seed spices – making it the perfect in-a-pinch broth for your gut-healing soups, stews + mugs!

 

Find my recipe for Kale Pesto Chicken Soup

over on the 21 Day Sugar Detox blog!

Pesto Chicken Pizza from The Healing Kitchen (Paleo, AIP)

This may be one of the most popular recipes in The Healing Kitchen so far! Pizza is a universally loved food. Have you ever met a person who said, “I don’t like pizza.” No. I’ve met people who say they don’t like cilantro (weird), or beer (extra weird), or cake with frosting (psychotic). BUT PIZZA? I’d send them straight to the neurologist to get their brain right. I spent all of college deciding how I could procure pizza while just the right amount of drunk. Not so intoxicated that it came back up 45 minutes later and not so sober that I had any guilty feelings about sitting on a curb with two slices of cheese that only cost $1.95 each. It was a delicate balance. 

Now, no guilty feelings of excessive pizza consumption exist. Mostly because I can’t eat gluten, dairy or nightshades, so what’s the point? Or so I thought. I have tried gluten-free pizza without cheese (dumb), gluten-free pizza without nightshades but with cheese (about as satisfying as frosting-less cake), and gluten-free pizza without nightshades or cheese (also called bread). But when I developed this thin, crispy, flatbread-like pizza crust awhile back, it re-sparked my love for holding a triangular-shaped object topped with something yummy. Because us AIP-ers are fairly limited with the traditional pizza toppings like tomato sauce, cheese, and pepperoni, I had to create something that was bursting with flavor to make us forget our previous taste memories. The first time I had my first bite of AIP Pesto Chicken Pizza, I squealed. It didn’t leave me wanting anything else in the world besides another bite. My brother-in-law came home a few minutes later and I made him try it and he couldn’t believe it either (Paleo skeptic in the house). 

Please don’t leave off the olives. It’ll make me so sad. But if you do include olives, don’t use those nasty canned, soggy, tasteless ones. If that’s all you can get, then yes leave them off. Seek out an olive bar or at least a jar of oil-cured olives. I’m an olive snob. I admit it. It’s one of my biggest faults (sarcasm). Well, I’ve just used up all my parenthetical inclusions, so I’ll wrap this up fast because I can’t communicate without parenthesis. They’re my world. 

Enjoy real PIZZA! And check out three more PIZZA recipes in The Healing Kitchen including Prosciutto & Fig Bistro Pizza, Spinach & Garlic Lover’s Pizza & Ham and Pineapple Pizza!

2 reviews

Pesto Chicken Pizza

Preparation 00:30 2017-09-25T00:30:00+00:00 Cook Time 00:30 2017-09-25T00:30:00+00:00 Serves 4     adjust servings

Ingredients

Crust

Pesto

  • 2 cups loosely packed fresh basil leaves
  • 3/4 cup loosely packed fresh cilantro leaves
  • 1/3 cup mashed avocado
  • 1 tablespoon chopped garlic
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

Pesto Chicken Pizza

  • 1 recipe Crust
  • 1 recipe Pesto
  • 1 1/4 cups shredded cooked chicken
  • 1/4 cup sliced black olives
  • 1/4 cup sliced canned artichoke hearts
  • 1/4 teaspoon truffle salt or fine sea salt

Instructions

Crust

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a cookie sheet or pizza pan with parchment paper. 

  2. In a mixing bowl, whisk together the dry ingredients. Slowly pour in the olive oil, continuously stirring the mixture as you pour. Mix in the warm water thoroughly. The dough will be slightly crumbly, but once you roll it out in Step 3, it will bind together well. 

  3. Place the dough on the prepared cookie sheet or pizza pan. Lay another sheet of parchment paper on top of the dough and use your hands or a rolling pin to smooth the dough into a crust about ¼ inch thick. You may roll it into the desired shape, such as a circle, oval, or rectangle. 

  4. Bake for 12 to 13 minutes, until light golden brown and crisp. Use immediately in one of our pizza recipes, or let cool and store as directed 

 

Pesto

Place all the ingredients except the olive oil in a food processor and blend until the herbs are finely chopped. While the food processor is running, slowly pour in the olive oil to make a smooth pesto sauce. Pesto is best served after the flavors are allowed to marry for at least 1 hour.

 

Pesto Chicken Pizza

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. 

  2. Place the pre-baked pizza crust on a cookie sheet or pizza pan. Spread the pesto evenly on the crust, reserving a few tablespoons for garnish, if desired. Top with the chicken, olives, artichoke hearts, and salt. 

  3. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until the crust is crispy and the edges of the toppings are lightly browned. Let rest for a few minutes, then slice the pizza using a rocker knife or sharp pizza cutter. Garnish with a drizzle of the reserved pesto, if desired.

Butternut Rice with Beef & Nut-Free Basil Pesto (Paleo, AIP, Whole30)

paleo aip beef pesto

 


 

How many times a week do you stare into your fridge, nothing prepared, and say out loud “I need to eat and I need to eat NOW.” Me: 5 to 10 times a week on average, on a good week. I’m pretty horrible at “meal planning”. Like I PLAN to eat at least 3 meals a day, but I’m no good at planning what those meals will be. Lately, I’ve started to think at least 24 hours in advance and it’s saved me a lot of curse words. I’m going to store those up for a later date. Like when Macy’s smells like dust and polyester and I wonder what the _____ I’m doing in there. 

 

I have a hard time clothing shopping in public these days. Most of my purchases are made online in hopes of the item not looking terrible. If it’s a 5/10 or greater I keep it, rather than hassling myself with a return. I also care almost zero about clothing these days, so that helps. I don’t walk around looking like a schlep, I just don’t go all out like I used to (high-waisted skirts, tucked in blouses, statement necklaces, 4-inch pumps). Nothing sounds more horrible than what I just typed. I now go for comfort. I have a favorite pair of black leggings that look good no matter how much I weigh (that tends to fluctuate) and I know what looks good on my petite frame: long asymmetrical, lightweight, not too baggy shirts and sweaters with knee high slim boots. Now everything in my closet resembles this outfit in some way but that’s okay. I can’t help it – Whole Foods really knows my style.

 

Yes, that’s right, almost all my shopping is done at the same time as picking out 3 pounds of wild-caught sockeye salmon for chowder that evening. It’s a very gratifying and thrifty experience and it’s one of the only places I can get organic cotton and fair trade clothing without feeling like a sweet 4-year-old hastily sewed together my knits. I’m not negating child labor with that statement; I have found it increasingly difficult for me to shop at typical retailers like GAP and LOFT these days. I only like to support retailers that serve well-raised animals, so why wouldn’t I want to support clothing retailers that treat humans like humans should be treated! 

 

Unplanned rant for the week. Sowwy. 

 

About this recipe a little more: I made this basil pesto vinaigrette for my friends this weekend over a spinach salad. It was way too amazing to not develop into a recipe so this evening when I saw grass fed beef and a lone butternut squash in my kitchen just pleading to be eaten. I wanted to keep this recipe super simple for a weeknight meal and let the basil pesto do all the talking! If you want to add more greens, definitely throw in several handfuls of spinach when you add the bone broth and let it wilt! You can even add chopped roasted garlic, minced shallot, extra basil or parsley, whatever your sweet little heart desires! And it makes awesome leftovers!!

 

This was my first dish using my NEW Cuisinart 9-cup food processor! And I am obsessed. You can make all different types of vegetable “rices”, thinly slice sweet potatoes to make homemade sweet potato chips in the oven, pulse small amounts of hard to chop foods like garlic & herbs and make the easiest chunky guacamole you ever did see! If you haven’t finished your holiday wish list you MUST add a food processor so you can get even more creative in your kitchen!!

 

 

 

Beef & Butternut Rice with Nut-Free Pesto

Preparation 00:15 2017-09-25T00:15:00+00:00 Cook Time 00:10 2017-09-25T00:10:00+00:00 Serves 4     adjust servings

Ingredients

  • 4 cups peeled and cubed butternut squash
  • 1 1/2 pounds grass fed ground beef (or pork or lamb)
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 1/2 cup bone broth of choice
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons lemon juice nutritional yeast flakes, for serving (optional)

Nut-Free Pesto

  • 2 cups basil leaves, packed
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh parsley leaves
  • 1/2 cup extra virgin olive oil
  • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon fine sea salt

Instructions

  1. Make butternut rice by running cubed squash through your food processor using the shredder blade attachment. Scoop into a separate bowl and set aside. Wipe down food processor bowl so it will be clean when you make the pesto below.

  2. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add ground beef in skillet and season with sea salt. Cook beef, breaking up into small pieces, until browned and cooked through, about 3 to 4 minutes.

  3. Add butternut rice to the pan and toss well with the beef. Pour broth into pan, bring to a boil, and cover with a lid. Cook for 2 minutes until butternut is tender.

  4. Remove lid and cook for a couple more minutes until most of the broth has evaporated. Season with lemon juice and remove from heat immediately.

  5. Meanwhile make pesto: Place all pesto ingredients in clean food processor using regular blade attachment. Turn the machine on for at least 30 seconds until a very finely minced pesto sauce is achieved. Set aside.
  6. Distribute beef and rice among individual serving bowls and drizzle with desired amount of basil pesto. I personally like a hefty amount because it is utterly delicious and addictive! Serve warm sprinkled with nutritional yeast if desired & enjoy!

 

 

Pesto Pasta w/ Roasted Grapes+ Caramelized Leeks

Pasta_edited.jpg

I listen to  A LOT of “Paleo” /health podcasts (Balanced Bites, Fat Burning Man, Bulletproof Exec are my favorites) when I work out. I stopped listening to music because it seemed like 45 minutes of lost opportunity to learn something new. Recently, Stefani Ruper of the new book “Sexy by Nature” has been guesting on shows. I bought her book on Amazon after hearing her talk about revolutionizing how women see themselves. Most of us spend the day juding ourselves and others in purely superficial ways.

 

Guilty. It’s something I am working on and I think her book will give me the evidence needed to help me change my thought habits. It’s extremely dehumanizing that we live in a society that tells us our worth comes from the surface. The $13 billion pornography industry is one of our worst enemies, in my opinion. In college, I did a speech in my public speaking class about the consequences of pornography introduction in our male youth. I asked the class “How many of you know someone who is addicted to porn?”, 30 out of the 36 students raised their hands. I then asked “How many of you think Internet pornography should be regulated?” Nobody’s hand went up.

 

The sexualization of women in the media (including fashion magazines) is out of control. It’s hard not to feed into it when you’re inundated with sexy makeup ads starting at age 6. It’s in our 20’s and 30’s that I think, as women, we finally have the maturity and emotional intelligence to shed ourselves of these suffocating thoughts.

 

I have found that by eating real whole food, I have been able to let go of a lot of negative body images. I eat A LOT more calorie-wise than I used to, but I don’t EVER stress about food, quantity, or calories. I nourish from the inside and it shows on the outside. It’s really been freeing. It seems that’s what Stefani’s book is going to be about: letting go of self-judgment and realizing that we’re much more than crows feet + saddlebags. Can you imagine how absolutely boring we would be if we were just a shell?

 

On to food talk: this pasta recipe requires a spiralizer to get those perfect sweet potato noodles. I highly suggest buying one on Amazon; they are super affordable and so versatile. There’s a ton of flavor here. No meat – but if you’re looking to up the protein, some shredded chicken thighs or ground pork woudl go nice.

Pesto Pasta with Caramelized Leeks + Roasted Grapes 

2 servings | 40 minutes

1 cup red grapes

1 leek, thinly sliced, white part only

1 1/2 T coconut oil, divided

1 large sweet potato, scrubbed and peeled

Walnut Basil Pesto

1 cup basil leaves, tightly packed

¾ cup walnut halves

¼ cup olive oil

1 tsp lemon juice

1 garlic clove, crushed

¼ tsp salt

  1. Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Roast grapes on a parchment-lined baking sheet for 25 minutes, stirring halfway through the baking time. Set aside.
  2. While grapes are roasting, make the rest of the recipe to save time.
  3. Heat 1 T coconut oil over medium heat in a skillet. Add sliced leeks to pan and do not disturb for 3 minutes. Stir the leeks, turn heat to low, then cover with a lid for 10 -12 minutes. Stir periodically so they do not burn. Set aside.
  4. To make pesto: Combine all ingredients in food processor. Set aside.
  5. Run sweet potato through your spiralizer to make long noodles.
  6. Heat ½ T coconut oil in skillet over medium heat. Add sweet potato noodles and cook for 5-6 minutes, tossing often with tongs, until they are cooked through but not mushy.
  7. Remove skillet from stove and gently stir in grapes, leeks, and 3 T pesto.
  8. Serve with a dollop of pesto and a drizzle of olive oil.