Olive Pesto Meatza (Paleo, AIP, Whole30, 21dsd)

 

I was out to dinner the other night after seeing Trainwreck, and I was forced (well, that’s dramatic) to watch others eat delicious chewy pizza from Eataly. That’s a ginormous Italian food market in Chicago that has a bunch of different restaurants, meat, cheese, produce, and oils/vinegars. I bought fresh basil, prosciutto, fresh figs, and mango and made little bundles and ate that for dinner, but I went home jonesin’ for some pizza pie. I haven’t made “meatza” in a super long time as it’s more of a Paleo entry-level recipe and I’ve been eating this way for 3 1/2 years so the novelty wore off fast. But since I finally finished up recipes for The Healing Kitchen, I am trying to get back to the basics of meat & veggies as I was going a little too creative with each meal. There are 4 pizza recipes in the book, so you can imagine that I have eaten pizza 8-12 times in the past 4 months! But now I’m in the pizza habit, and in order to ween myself off such an insistent craving, meatza is making a re-entry back into my life. Meatza, especially AIP meatza, isn’t going to blow you away by how much it reminds you of the real stuff. It’s NOT pizza. I don’t care if you even get to eat tomatoes & cheese – it’s still NOT pizza. 

 

BUT it is a fun & new way to get your meat & veg for the day in a pretty simple manner! This recipe uses a 2-minute olive ‘pesto’ as the base instead of a sauce which usually takes a bit of time to make. The zucchini and squash are quickly sauteed and served as is over a “crust” of ground chicken. You can use ground sausage, pork, bison or beef as well. Eat with a fork & knife or cut into large slices and eat with your hands! Speaking of hands… and feet, and abs, butt and pecs. Have you SEEN Trainwreck? You see all of John Cena’s EVERYTHING. Almost (it’s only R rated). I didn’t know who that was but I saw the movie with friends and went home and told my husband that some “large, muscle-y man is naked”. Then we went to see it again with different people and he was like, “Yeah, that’s a famous wrestler, idiot.” Okay, he didn’t call me an idiot (I’m sure he wanted to though), but I feel like I should know who that is. I also did not know who Tony Roma was, but now I do thanks to the movie indutry’s persistance in using professional athletes to sell chick flick tickets to their male counterparts. I guess I have officially assimiliated into American culture now. Overall, I thought the movie was pretty funny – mostly because of how inappropriate it was – I love inappropriateness. There’s too many rules in this world. We need less rules. Like I feel like I should be able to swim in my apartment’s pool before 10 am, but the sign says I can’t. Even though there are zero children in the pool at that time to splash me and make me swear off pregnancy for another 4 years. Doesn’t my management company want to prevent the overpopulation of their building? Clearly their interests lie elsewhere. 

 

Anyways, meatza. I just really like that word. Did you notice? 

 

 

 

 

Olive Pesto Meatza 

Serves 2 | Prep Time 8 minutes | Cook Time 12 minutes | Total Time 20 minutes

1 lb ground chicken thigh

3 tbsp coconut flour

1 tsp dried oregano

½ tsp garlic powder

½ tsp sea salt

10 oz black olives, drained (6 oz once drained)

½ cup packed basil leaves

1 tbsp olive oil

1 small zucchini, thinly sliced

1 small yellow squash, thinly sliced

1 tsp balsamic vinegar

 

1. Combine chicken, coconut flour, oregano, garlic, and sea salt in a bowl. Set aside.

2. Pulse olives and basil in a blender until finely chopped. Set aside.

3. Heat olive oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Sautee zucchini and squash for 5-6 minutes until cooked and wilted. Stir in balsamic. Transfer to a bowl.

4. Press chicken mixtue into the bottom of the skillet using your hands to create a 10-inch wide and 1/2-inch thick circle. You may also form the circle on a piece of parchment and transfer the meat to the skillet. Cook on each side fo 3 minutes until cooked through and golden brown, carefully using a large spatula to flip the “crust” over halfway through.

5. Top with olive pesto then layer with cooked zucchini and squash. Slice into quarters and serve warm.

Lamb with Olive Tapenade Rice (Paleo, AIP, Whole30)

 

 

If you like olives, make this tonight. If you don’t like olives, we cannot be friends in real life. Fine. Yes, we can. We just can’t be the type of friends that sit around on a Thursday night throwing olives into each other’s mouths from across the living room.

 

You know what I’m tired of seeing? Paleo recipes that use quotation marks to delineate that the “Rice” or “Bread” in the recipe isn’t your standard grain-based rice or bread. It makes you feel like you’re losing out (you’re not). Like, “hey you know Rice, that sexy guy down the street? This isn’t him, but it’s Rice’s cute little sister “rice”‘. How about we just revise what those words mean and never use quotation marks again?

 

I had my first visit with a naturopathic doctor today. I have given up on the Western medical community. I am reserving their services the next time I sprain my ankle or need some advice on what not to do. I am super excited about her. She sent me home with a stool test. That should be fun. I had to take the train home with my nondescript white paper bag full of empty stool samples that cost $300. I was PARANOID that someone would choose this evening to mug me. I sometimes plan in my head what I will say if someone does try to rob me (“What would your mother say if she saw what you were up to?”) Tonight I decided a simple “That’s for my poop.” should ward off any villains.

 

Lamb with Olive Tapenade Rice

Serves 3-4 | Prep Time 10 minutes | Cook Time 14 minutes

1/2 cup Kalamata olives, pitted

1 tbsp chopped fresh Oregano

1 tbsp Olive oil

3 cups Butternut squash, cubes

1 lb Ground lamb

1/2 tsp Cinnamon

1/2 cup Raisins

1/2 tsp Sea salt

  1. Place olives, oregano, and olive oil in a food processor/blender and pulse until finely chopped. Set aside.
  2. Now place butternut squash in the blender/processor (no need to wash it – yay!) and pulse until finely chopped. Set aside.
  3. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add the ground lamb. Do not disturb for 4 minutes until the lamb is browned on one side. Now use a wooden spoon to break the meat into bite-sized chunks (size of mini meatballs). Flip each chunk and brown the other side for 2 minutes.
  4. Add in the riced olives, butternut, cinnamon, raisins, and sea salt. Stir well, cover with a lid, and reduce heat to low. Cook for 5-6 more minutes. Serve warm.

 

Triple Meat Poutine [AIP-Friendly]

Okay, so between this recipe and my one for Beaver Tails/”Queues de castor”, I am taking you all on a Paleo journey of my birth city, Montreal. Now these are no replacement for the real thing. Traditional poutine is fairly soggy, salty, and drenched in MSG-laden gravy and cheese curds, but we can all imagine how good that tastes despite being absolutely terrible for our insides. THIS version won’t make you feel like a bag of donkey poo though. It’s high in zinc, vitamin A, and deliciosuness. Try to find the Japanese sweet potatoes for the best rendition of white potato fries. That’s some good Canadian bar food right thur.  If you want the most accurate poutine experience, consume this at 4 a.m. inside a grungy diner occupied by a man wearing a flea collar. *Knowing wink*I am about to throw my cell phone out the window. I don’t recall people contacting me 4 million times a day prior to its invention. I can’t get any work done because the damn thing won’t stop dinging. And I have a terrible notification noise.. the Samsung Whistle. I don’t know how to change it/I haven’t attempted to figure out how to do anything besides take pictures of my doodle, text grocery lists to my fiance, and ignore incoming phone calls. Just kidding, mom. I was totally brushing my teeth the last time you called xoxoHow am I supposed to procrastinate school and house work if I’m too busy responding to text messages like “Hey, did you leave a black sock in my apartment when you visited 4 months ago?”On a separate topic, it’s Farmer’s Market season in Chicago and you know what that means. Lavendar Blueberry Gelato for Saturday morning breakfast. My apologies for this picture. I took it on a rainy day, indoors, when I was really hungry, so yeah.Triple Meat PoutineServes 2 1 lb Japanese sweet potato, washed and dried1 tsp coconut oil½ tsp each rosemary, thyme, and marjoram, finely chopped (divided)1 T shallot, finely diced1 clove garlic, minced2 slices thick-cut bacon, chopped into ½ inch pieces8 oz ground beef1 to 2 tsp arrowroot powder¼ cup hot water1 oz prosciutto, thinly sliveredRosemary Fries

  1. Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
  2. Slice sweet potato into fries 2 inches long and 1/3 inch wide.
  3. Toss fries in coconut oil, rosemary, and salt to taste. Heads up: while the fries are baking, you can make the gravy on the stoptop!
  4. Bake fries for 15 minutes on one side. Then flip and bake for another 10-15 minutes until browned in some spots.

Herb Beef & Bacon Gravy

  1. Fry bacon in skillet over medium heat. Once crispy, remove from pan to paper tower lined plate. Keep fat in skillet!
  2. Add shallot and garlic to pan. Sautee for 1 minute until fragrant.
  3. Add ground beef, thyme, and marjoram. Cook until no pink in meat remains.
  4. Whisk the hot water & 1 tsp arrowroot powder together. Pour into pan and bring to a simmer while constantly stirring.
  5. Simmer the beef gravy until most of the water is absorbed. Use the leftover 1 tsp arrowroot powder to thicken it up, if too much water remains after 3-4 minutes of simmering.
  6. Stir in chopped prosciutto and bacon. Top fries with gravy and eat with a fork!

AIP Pita Bread (Paleo, Grain-free)

I teased this recipe for AIP Pita Bread on Instagram a couple weeks ago and finally had the chance to make it again! I am a huge fan of the pliability, texture, and taste of the final product! My husband says it tastes like vegetables (UH because it’s made from vegetables, Honey!!!) but I know my fellow AIPers are veggie hounds just like me. I love how easy it is to throw into the blender and whip up for a fun meal too! And so nutritious too – sweet potato, avocado, gelatin, olive oil – this is a crap free zone!

 

If you’re looking for some ideas on how to use the pita, I have been eating it with my AIP Hummus, olive tapenade, sliced cucumbers, and lettuce for Mediterranean Wraps which is SO GOOD.

 

I also want to experiment with using it as a Breakfast Wrap with breakfast sausage, avocado, and some melty Zucchini Cheese.

 

Next week, I’m going to make another batch to bring to work for Chicken Salad wraps with my Crunchy Slaw.

 

Okay,  I gave you 3 ideas. Now you have to tell me how you end up serving these wraps!

 

This grain-free pita is made just from real food ingredients!

 

1 review

AIP Pita Bread

Preparation 00:05 2017-09-25T00:05:00+00:00 Cook Time 00:15 2017-09-25T00:15:00+00:00 Serves Makes 1 pita     adjust servings

Ingredients

Instructions

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
2. Add all ingredients to a small blender or food processor. Process until a dough is formed, scraping down the sides as needed. Alternatively, you can hand mix the dough in a medium bowl, but it must be smooth, well mixed, and a thick dough consistency.
3. Spoon the dough onto the baking sheet and use your hands to form an oval shape approximately 4 inches wide and 8 inches long. Bake for 14 minutes until it can be easily peeled away from the parchment paper.

 

Garlic Fried Chicken Livers (Paleo, AIP, Whole30, 21dsd)

 

 

Chicken livers are my favorite organ meat because they are the most mild and versatile. Beef liver, even when hidden in bacon, mushrooms, and herbs, still is undoable for me. And I’ve had it a lot. It just never gets any better. Maybe my taste buds will change soon for it.

 

I’m currently homeless. The apartment complex that was supposed to house me for 3 months in Atlanta decided they actually don’t have a furnished unit for us even though I start my new job in 10 days. This is going to be a real holiday treat trying to find last minute housing and furniture. I’ve had the worst luck lately with poor customer service. I guess it’s not really bad luck but a testament to how inefficient the service industry has become. Sigh. I cannot wait to be a homeowner, even though that has its own issues, at least you have a bit more control.

 

Well, what I can control right now is my breathing. And writing helps me get my mind off crappy life events. I enjoyed a big bowl of these yummy garlic-fried chicken livers with my pup last week on the balcony. One for me, one for him. He maxed out at two though. What a wimpy doodle.

 

These pan-friend chicken livers will convert organ meat haters! And you can’t beat the nutrition of offal!

 

 

1 review

Garlic Fried Chicken Livers

Preparation 00:10 2017-09-25T00:10:00+00:00 Cook Time 00:00 2017-09-25T00:00:00+00:00

Ingredients

  • 1 lb pastured chicken livers
  • 1/4 cup coconut flour
  • 1 tablespoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 tsp granulated garlic
  • 1/4 tsp sea salt
  • Coconut oil for frying
  • Sliced lemons and parsley for serving

Instructions

  1. Whisk dry ingredients together in a bowl. Add chicken livers and toss to coat evenly.
  2. Heat 1 tablespoon coconut oil in large deep frying pan over medium-high heat. Add half of the chicken livers to the pan, ensuring they do not touch, and let fry for 3 minutes. Flip and let cook 3 more minutes. Place on paper-towel lined plate. Repeat with the second half of chicken livers, adding more coconut oil to pan as needed.
  3. Serve with sliced lemons and a sprinkle of parsley.

Roast Chicken with Lebanese Stuffing (Paleo, AIP, Whole30)

I was crossing my fingers that I would nail this recipe on the first attempt and I did. I think because I have such an emotional connection to this meal from childhood, my limbic system was able to guide my cooking intuition. I explained on Instagram recently that my family didn’t do traditional Thanksgiving turkey & stuffing growing up, but a simple Lebanese roasted chicken stuffed with a spiced mixture of beef, rice, onion, pine nuts, cinnamon and allspice. I was hell-bent on making an AIP version of all my favorite “Lebanese Feast” (that’s what my twin sister and I call it) dishes so I can enjoy them this year too. Last year, I couldn’t eat ANY of the Christmas dinner, and I threw a temper tantrum full of tears and “Why can’t  you guys realize that it sucks to have allergies, and that I deserve to eat this food too!!!!” So attractive. I still throw tantrums in my head, but I try not to execute them in front of other humans. That’s how you do AIP responsibly.

 

It was really only after that outburst that my family recognized my need to have that emotional connection to food that they all still get to enjoy. Nobody was going to forgo the rice stuffing or tahini and chickpea hummus just for me though, so I said F it, I’m going to make my own AIP versions and they’re going to be even better, starting with this dish! The parsnips add such a nice earthy taste, and you won’t believe how awesome ground beef stuffing with a perfectly roasted chicken tastes! The skin will be crispy and the meat very juicy by using my method below. With a squeeze of roasted lemon on top and a heaping scoop of stuffing, you’re going to shoot right out of any bland food rut you may have found yourself in lately (it happens to the best of us!)

 

So for Lebanese Christmas Feast this year, I’ll be making both the traditional and AIP versions of these dishes

– Lebanese Chicken & Stuffing (recipe  below)

AIP Hummus by Me

AIP Pita by He Won’t Know Its Paleo

– Whole Carrot Taboulleh from The Paleo Approach Cookbook

– AIP Kibbeh (recipe to be developed) <– this usually has gluten, pine nuts, and seed-based spices

– AIP Mammoul Balls (recipe to be developed) <– these are traditionally made of walnuts

 

 

 

Lebanese Roast Chicken & Stuffing

Serves 4-5 | Ready in

Beef & Parsnip Rice Stuffing

1 lb lean grass-fed ground beef

1 small onion, peeled and diced

6 large parsnips, cut into chunks

1 tsp cinnamon, divided

1/16 tsp ground cloves

1/2 tsp sea salt

1 cup bone broth, divided

1 T lard

2 T dried mint

¼ tsp granulated garlic

2 tsp lemon juice

Optional: 1/4 cup toasted pine nuts (if tolerated – not AIP)

  1. Process parsnips in food processor using the ricing disc, or alternatively pulse in a high powered blender until the parnsip is broken into rice-sized pieces.
  2. Cook ground beef in a large, deep skillet until almost cooked through. Break up with a spoon into small pieces as it cooks. Turn heat off and stir in just ½ tsp cinnamon, cloves, and ¼ tsp sea salt. Set aside in a bowl.
  3. Heat lard over medium heat in the same skillet. Add onions first and then the parsnips, cover, and let cook for 3 minutes until the bottom layer of onions begins to caramelize. Remove lid and stir well. Add just ½ cup bone broth to skillet. Cover with lid again and let steam cook for 3 more minutes until parsnips are cooked through but still tender. Remove pan from heat, stir in mint, remaining ½ tsp cinnamon, remaining ½ cup bone broth, remaining ¼ tsp sea salt, garlic, lemon juice,  the cooked ground beef, and pine nuts (if using). The broth should be absorbed in the meat and vegetables as you stir.

Lebanese Roast Chicken

1 whole pasture-raised chicken (about 3 lbs)

1 T lard

½ lemon

4 sprigs fresh oregano

4 sprigs fresh rosemary

½ tsp sea salt

  1. Remove chicken from refrigerator 30 minutes prior to seasoning.
  2. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Set a small roasting rack on top of a large baking sheet. This allows the chicken to crisp up on the bottom too. No one likes soggy chicken skin.
  3. Prepare the chicken for roasting: Dry the chicken well by patting with paper towels both on the outside and inside the cavity (very important!!). Rub lard on the chicken, coating evenly. Sprinkle the sea salt evenly over the whole chicken. Stuff the lemon and fresh herbs in the cavity and tie the legs together with kitchen string. You can also bring the wings closer to the breast and secure them tightly with another piece of string.
  4. Cook the chicken: Roast on prepared rack and baking sheet for 55 minutes. Increasing cooking time by 15 minutes per lb (if chicken weighs more than 3 lbs) until breast internal temperature reads 170 degrees Fahrenheit. Turn the oven off and let the chicken rest in the oven for 10 minutes with the door closed. Remove the chicken from the oven and let rest on the countertop, covered, for 10 more minutes before slicing. After slicing, squeeze lemon all over chicken and sprinkle with more sea salt. Serve with warm Beef & Parsnip Stuffing and AIP Hummus!

AIP Garlic Butter (Paleo, Vegan)

 

I didn’t know I missed garlic butter until I tasted AIP garlic butter. My mother (aka Mommy and Moo-Moo… yes Moo-Moo) used to stir fresh crushed garlic into tubs of butter when I was growing up, and we would slather it all over toast with a giant salad as the main course. There’s a reason I have a vegetable fetish – we ate salads almost every single night for dinner. Fist bump, Moo-Moo, you did it right!

 

So you can make this recipe into the solid form as seen above with a simple modification of adding 1 T coconut oil, OR you can leave that out and just have a whipped butter spread. Presentation-wise, the butter stick is more endearing for dinner parties and such, but either way it’s going to end up into melted goodness as seen on that euphoric roasted Japanese yam below. Ah, this stuff is SO good. I tossed my steamed veggies in it tonight, served it as a spread on cold chicken meatballs the other day, and have eaten more than 1 and less than 6 spoonfuls of the stuff just for fun.

 

I head to NYC on Friday for my twin sister’s bachelorette party. I’m the “matron” of honor, so I’ve been planning the whole thing. I’ll update everyone when I get back, but I hope to share some of my eats on Instagram over the weekend! This old matron needs her rest now – I think my eyelids droop a quarter inch every time I type the word “matron” .

 

 
AIP Garlic Butter

Ready in 5 minutes (+ 1 hour fridge time for stick version)

½ cup palm shortening

2 T red palm oil

1 ½ tsp pressed garlic (about 3-4 large cloves)

¼ tsp fine sea salt

1 T melted coconut oil (optional: for butter stick version)

  1. In a medium-sized bowl, stir together the palm shortening, red palm oil, garlic, and sea salt until well combined and smooth. Alternately, you can whip it together for the ultimate light and fluffy texture using a hand mixer.
  2. For whipped butter, simply store in a covered glass container for up to 2 weeks.
  3. For stick butter, stir in the melted coconut oil. Pour mixture into a log shape on a square of parchment or wax paper. Roll into a rectangular shape, using your fingers to square off the ends and shape the butter as desired. Let harden in refrigerator for 1 hour. Store in a covered glass container for up to 2 weeks.

AIP Hummus (Paleo, Whole30, Vegan)

I freakin’ love hummus. It hurts so bad. You know that lame quote “If you love something let it go, if it comes back to you…”  That’s how I feel about eating AIP Hummus. Sorry, if you used that quotation on your MySpace in 2004; I don’t mean to offend. Internet memes are the new MySpace quote. I just feel like if we spent as much time and energy into volunteering or holding the door for a stranger as we did making memes, this world would really be a different place.

 

Speaking of good deeds, I walked by a homeless man last night. He asked me for money, but I didn’t have anything with me. He told me he takes credit cards. That made me chuckle, so I wanted to go get him a nice treat as a thank you. I went into a little vegan bakery next door and just gave them my memorized credit card number so I could purchase a couple muffins for the gentleman. I thought “I bet he would LOVE some fresh-baked muffins when he wakes up tomorrow morning.” I tracked him down in the parking lot of the gas station he was hanging out, and the following conversation ensued.

 

“Hi, sir. I bought you some muffins. There’s a chocolate and a blueberry.”

– “I don’t want your muffins.”

“But, I bought them just for you. They’re nice and fresh!”

– “I don’t like muffins. I don’t want muffins. I ain’t gonna eat your muffins.”

 

That reads like an innuendo, but it is not. Lesson learned: ask people what they want if you’re going to buy them food! I ended up handing them off to a couple valet guys that looked cold and bored. The irony is we ended up watching the Muffin Top episode of Seinfield an hour after this happened. SEE BELOW. I DIED. Life lessons, life lessons.

 

Rebecca: Are you the ones leaving the muffin pieces behind our shelter?

Elaine: You been enjoying them?

Rebecca: They’re just stumps.

Elaine: Well they’re perfectly edible.

Rebecca: Oh, so you just assume that the homeless will eat them, they’ll eat anything?

Mr. Lippman: No no, we just thought…

Rebecca: I know what you thought. They don’t have homes, they don’t have jobs, what do they need the top of a muffin for? They’re lucky to get the stumps.

Elaine: If the homeless don’t like them the homeless don’t have to eat them.

Rebecca: The homeless don’t like them.

Elaine: Fine.

 

Muffins and hummus have nothing to do with one another but dang it are they both delicious! This bean-free AIP hummus is missing tahini (which is a seed and not allowed in the elimination diet until reintroductions) so it’s not exactly like real hummus but I have served it to family at holidays with my AIP Taboulleh and everyone loved it just the same!

 

 

AIP Hummus

Preparation 00:00 2017-09-25T00:00:00+00:00 Cook Time 00:00 2017-09-25T00:00:00+00:00

Ingredients

  • 4 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 3 cups peeled and cubed white sweet potato
  • 2-3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup olive oil (additional for thinning if desired)
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt

Instructions

  1. Fit a steamer basket over a pot filled halfway with water. Place the cubed sweet potatoes in the basket. Cover and bring to a boil. Let steam for 10 minutes until the potato easily breaks apart with a fork. Reserve the cooking liquid.
  2. Place sweet potato, ¼ cup reserved cooking liquid, and remaining ingredients in food processor. Blend until pureed and completely smooth. You may thin with additional olive oil to your preference.
  3. Serve drizzled with olive oil, fresh parsley, and chopped vegetable crudite, or as a spread on AIP or Paleo sandwiches. Store covered in refrigerator and let come to room temperature before serving (It will solidify slightly in the fridge).

 

 

Anti-Inflammatory Meatballs (Paleo, AIP, Whole30, 21DSD)

 


AIP is inherently an anti-inflammatory diet, so the title of this recipe is like describing a banana to someone who has never eaten one as “banana-y”. These ‘balls are especially designed for people with inflammatory conditions like rheumatoid arthritis, Crohn’s, and colitis. Just so happens they taste fantastic.

 

I wanted to support my anti-inflammatory claims with some hard & fast research. This kind of stuff really gets me going, and I have a feeling most of you are pretty into the magic of food too.

 

Ginger Benefits

  • Ginger has been shown to relieve joint pain associated with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) by inhibiting prostaglandin activity and leukotriene biosynthesis, which are major players in the inflammatory process
  • Researches fed 33 mg of ginger oil to arthritic rats for 26 days, significantly suppressing paw and joint swelling
  • 75% of RA patients in one study experienced marked pain relief and swelling reduction when ingesting ginger, and 100% of people in the study with muscular discomfort reported the same results (Al-Nahain, Jahan & Rahmatullah, 2014)

 

Cilantro Benefits

  • Rats with carageenan*-induced paw edema had significant reductions in inflammation when fed dried coriander (cilantro) seeds via a reduction in macrophagic (inflammatory) activity
  • These rats also showed a significant reduction in granulomas and tumors (Nair, Singh & Gupta, 2013)
  • *Yeah that stuff in your ice cream.

 

Garlic Benefits

  • A study exploring the effects of garlic on insulin resistance, inflammation and oxidative stress of diabetic rats on a high fructose diet found that garlic reduced blood glucose levels and indications of oxidative stress caused by diabetes
  • Garlic has been shown in other studies to lower blood lipid levels and have anti-coagulant and anti-cancer effects
  • Garlic extract used in the study above was made by boiling 100g whole garlic in water for 20 minutes (Sivaraman, Senthilkumar & Bobby, 2013)

 

 

 

These anti-inflammatory beef meatballs feature the powers of cilantro, garlic and ginger!

 

 

1 review

Anti-Inflammatory Meatballs

Preparation 00:15 2017-09-25T00:15:00+00:00 Cook Time 00:25 2017-09-25T00:25:00+00:00 Serves 4     adjust servings

 

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs ground beef
  • Zest of 1 lime
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro, tightly packed
  • 5 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1/2 tsp ground ginger
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt

Instructions

  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line a baking sheet with foil or parchment paper.
  2. Mix all ingredients together in a large bowl. Form into 12 equal size meatballs, about 1 ½ inches in diameter. Bake for 23-25 minutes until the center is light pink. Sprinkle with extra sea salt before serving.
  3. Store in a sealed glass container in the fridge or freezer. Serve with a green salad with sliced avocado, parsley, and cilantro.

Recipe Notes

 You may also use ground pork here or 1 to 2 teaspoons fresh grated ginger in place of the ground ginger. 

 

Garlic & Herb Chicken Nuggets (Paleo, AIP, Whole30, 21DSD)

 


Chicken nuggets and BBQ Sauce were one of the few junk foods my mom allowed us to eat occasionally when we were tiny tots. Still one of my favorite foods – how worldly and classy of me.

 

We had another beautfIul weekend in Chicago before sh*t hits the fan and its -30 degrees for 12 days straight. We went to a Notre Dame football game this weekend, and it was SO adorable to see my husband giddy like a 7-year-old boy seeing his first Sports Illustrated. He has liked the Irish since he was a little guy without cable in the middle of small town Nebraska – apparently ND was one of the only games they got on TV. I bought him a new fancy pullover sweatshirt to wear to the game and a hat for myself. I feel like a huge fraud with all these people coming up to us in Chicago today pumping their fists and shouting “Go Irish!” I have to awkwardly respond with my own forced fist pump and pretend I know what football is. The hat’s comfy so I’ll continue to wear it.

 

Garlic & Herb Chicken Nuggets [AIP, Whole30, 21dsd]

Makes 3 servings | Prep time 5 minutes | Cook time 12-15 minutes

1 lb boneless skinless chicken thigh

1 tsp dried oregano

1 tsp dried basil

¼ tsp granulated garlic

¼ tsp sea salt (or garlic salt)

2 T coconut flour

2 T coconut oil

  1. Pat chicken thighs dry with a paper towel. Cut into 1-inch pieces.
  2. Toss chicken thighs in a bowl with oregano, basil, garlic, and 1/8 tsp sea salt (or garlic salt). Now toss with the coconut flour until evenly coated.
  3. Heat 1 T coconut oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Place half the chicken nuggets in the pan and ensure they are not touching. If the pan is overcrowded, they will not crisp up.
  4. Cook 3-4 minutes per side until golden brown all around and cooked through.
  5. Clean out the skillet by wiping it down with a paper towel. Repeat step 3 for the remaining half of chicken nuggets.
  6. Sprinkle nuggets with 1/8 tsp sea salt (or garlic salt). Serve warm.